Broadcast Archive

Live broadcasts produced in the NCTC Studio, Shepherdstown, WV.

Broadcast Video Index


Broadcast Videos

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Click here to download video!An Entirely Synthetic Fish: How Rainbow Trout Beguiled America and Overran the World (00:56:35)

Presented by author and ecologist Anders Halverson. February 27, 2013. “An Entirely Synthetic Fish” is the true story of the rainbow trout.

Sometimes vilified for their devastating effects on the native fauna, sometimes glorified as the preeminent sport fish, the rainbow trout is the repository of more than a century of America's often contradictory philosophies about the natural world. Exhaustively researched and grippingly rendered by award-winning journalist, aquatic ecologist, and lifelong fisherman Anders Halverson, this presentation chronicles the discovery of rainbow trout, their artificial propagation and distribution, and why they are being eradicated in some waters yet are still the most commonly stocked fish in the United States.

Anders Halverson is an award-winning writer with a Ph.D. in ecology from Yale University. He wrote this book as a research associate at the University of Colorado’s Center of the American West with a grant from the National Science Foundation.

Click here to download video!Another Day at the Office (00:00:53) FWS recruiting video clip.

Click here to download video!Best Practices for Recruiting and Hiring Persons with Disabilities SU #7 (00:19:48) Presented by Julia Bumbaca. Broadcast date: February 3, 2011.

Click here to download video!Birds of West Virginia and Beyond (00:45:11)

Presented by WV Division of Natural Resources Ornithologist, Richard Bailey. Topics include raptors, songbirds, migratory birds, conservation issues and an overview of the WV Breeding Bird Atlas.

Click here to download video!Bridging The Gap (01:40:29)

Bridging the Gaps is about understanding and accepting people from each of the four generations (Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials), and learning to interact in ways that increase engagement, satisfaction and productivity. To bring out the best in each employee and volunteer, we must be aware of and adjust to the styles and preferences of each of the four generations in the workforce. During this broadcast, we will discuss the characteristics, preferences, and values of each generation; describe the stereotypes that may get in the way of understanding a different generation; and provide tips to improve communication and interaction between the generations working in the Department of the Interior and its bureaus.

Click here to down load video!Career Video Mix (4 segments) (00:07:49)

FWS Recruiting: 4 Videos

  1. The Journey Begins, The Tradition Continues (short version)
  2. Another Day at the Office
  3. Conserving the Nature of America
  4. Meet your New Boss

Welcome to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service!

The agency you have joined has a long tradition and a proud heritage. You have joined a family of 8,000 dedicated men and women, engaged in one of the finest of callings – the conservation and stewardship of fish and wildlife.

You are a part of something much larger than yourself!

“The Journey Begins/The Tradition Continues – A Welcome to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service for New Employees” greets new employees to our agency and offers them a broad view of the activities, the scope, and the mission of one of America’s oldest conservation organizations. It presents the work of the Fish and Wildlife Service in the words of individual employees themselves.
The 33-minute video is part of the Fish and Wildlife Service’s new employee orientation program. New employees should be encouraged to view this videotape their first day of employment with our agency.

Click here to down load video!Cerulean Blues (00:40:09)

NCTC Historian, Dr. Mark Madison hosts an interview with author and conservationist Katie Fallon. Katie’s first book, Cerulean Blues: A Personal Search for a Vanishing Songbird. May 16, 2013.

Cerulean Blues: A Personal Search for a Vanishing Songbird, was published in 2011. The book details the life history of the Cerulean Warbler, the fastest declining warbler species in the United States. Thirty-five percent of the world’s population of the species breeds in West Virginia. More information can be found at: http://www.katiefallon.com/24494.html

Katie teaches writing at West Virginia University and is one of the founders of the Avian Conservation Center of Appalachia. ACCA is an all-volunteer organization located near Morgantown, WV. ACCA is licensed by the US Fish & Wildlife Service to treat and rehabilitate injured, ill, or orphaned wild birds. The ACCA mission is: To conserve wild birds through scientific research; education and public outreach; rescue and rehabilitation.

http://www.accawv.org

Click here to download video!Children and Nature-Using Books to Help Children Make a Difference in the World (00:58:03)

Interview with author Lynne Cherry. She is the author and/or illustrator of over thirty award-winning books for children. Her best-selling books such as The Great Kapok Tree and A River Ran Wild teach children to respect the earth.

Lynne is the founder and director of the non-profit Young Voices for the Planet , a 501 (c)(3) tax exempt organization dedicated to helping the voices of environmentally-concerned young people be heard. Lynne is also a movie producer. Her Young Voices for the Planet short films feature youth success stories: California kids helping to get a ban on plastic bags; Florida students saving their school $53,000 in energy costs; An 11-year old German boy planting a million trees... Young people reducing the carbon footprint of their homes, schools and communities.

Click here to download video!Conservation Connect Series: Earth Day (00:29:51)

Join host Chelsea McKinney, USFWS and student co-hosts for this Earth Day special event. April 22, 2014.

Click here to download video!Conservation Connect Series: Overview (00:22:31) Host Chelsea McKinney, USFWS describes NCTC's Conservation Connect series. February 5, 2014.

Click here to download video!Conserving The Nature of America: An Overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (00:03:04)

An Overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This 3-minute vid eo presents an overview of the work and activities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, America’s principal wildlife conservation agency. It is designed to precede formal presentations and programs by Fish and Wildlife Service employees, before general audiences, as a way of acquainting them with the scope and breadth of the work of America’s oldest national conservation agency. It is ideal for use before public audiences, including citizens groups, conservation organizations, and potential partners for cooperative conservation projects. It also makes a useful addition to exhibits at trade shows and public events as a repeating loop, by setting the player on continuous play.

Click here to download video!Developmental Coaching SU #7 (00:07:19) Presented by Jack Owens, USFWS. Broadcast date: February 3, 2011.

Click here to download video!Embracing the Cultural Diversity of our Visitors and Stakeholders (01:13:31)

Presented by Myron Floyd, PhD, NCSU, Prof./Director of Graduate Programs, Depart. of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Mgmt.; Iantha Gantt-Wright, MSA Founder and President of The Kenian Group; Lamar Gore, USFWS, NE RO, Chief, Diversity and Civil Rights.

An effective conservation strategy includes engagement of people within diverse populations. To be relevant, we need to be innovative, resourceful and also respectful of what’s important to the people we are attempting to reach. Welcoming all groups and individuals, including those who traditionally may not be as directly connected. In this broadcast, we will more clearly define what we mean by diversity which encompasses culture, ethnicity, economics, age, gender, ability, and explore ways to foster inclusion for conservation. The broadcast also includes an interactive round table discussion with the host and viewers asking the panel about their experiences with embracing diversity for conservation.

Click here to download video!Engaging with Urban Communities: Connecting People, Conservation & Public Land Agencies (01:09:10)

Presented by Flisa Stevenson, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Refuge Visitor Services; Gus Medina, Cornell University - Expanding Capacity in Environmental Education Project; Chantel Jimenez, San Diego NWR Complex. May 24, 2012.

This broadcast will focus on "place-based" urban conservation connections: who are some target audiences, why the environment matters to them and how we can become more involved with urban communities. In part one of the session, our presenters will introduce you to urban communities and how we can connect with them. Part two is an interactive round table discussion, with the host and viewers ( through email at broadcast@fws.gov ) asking the panel specific questions about linking public lands programs with conservation and urban communities.

Click here to download video!Fauna & Flora Int'l. - Nicaragua (00:40:00)

NCTC Historian, Dr. Mark Madison hosts an interview with Salvadora Morales of FFI. Salvadora is the Coordinator of the Ometepe Island Project for FFI in Nicaragua. This project is receiving funding support from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via the Wildlife Without Borders Regional Program for Latin America and the Caribbean. Ometepe is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, designated only fairly recently, in 2010. Recorded June 10, 2011.

Click here to download video!How to Lead Effective Meetings SU #7 (00:11:49) Presented by Mark Madison, USFWS. Broadcast date: February 3, 2011.

Click here to down load video!Katmai - Alaska's Wild Peninsula (00:56:13)

NCTC Historian, Dr. Mark Madison hosts an interview with NPS Filmmaker John Grabowska on his new film “Katmai - Alaska's Wild Peninsula”. April 22, 2013.

The breathtaking volcanic landscape of the Alaska Peninsula is home to the greatest concentration of coastal brown bears in North America. These bears are drawn to the largest sockeye salmon run in the world. Grabowska’s film captures all the excitement of these large mammals as they fight, fish, and interact with each other in this pristine environment.

National Park Service filmmaker John Grabowska has directed productions from the subarctic to subtropics. Often broadcast as prime time specials on PBS, his films have also won awards at festivals around the world. Grabowska led environmental media workshops in Argentina and Panama and has served as a guest lecturer at the Smithsonian Institution and National Geographic Society. He is one of the founders of the American Conservation Film Festival and the Washington Post calls him "one of the virtuoso environmental filmmakers in the country."

Click here to download video!Land Ethic Leaders: Aldo Leopold's Land Ethic for Today (01:18:13)

Presented by Jennifer Kobylecky, Education Coordinator, Aldo Leopold Foundation and Jeannine Richards, Communications Coordinator, Aldo Leopold Foundation. October 23, 2013.

In A Sand County Almanac, Aldo Leopold set forth his most enduring idea, the “land ethic,” a moral responsibility of humans to the natural world. Aldo Leopold’s land ethic idea is extremely relevant in today’s society, but it can be difficult to define, discuss, and implement. As Leopold himself suggested, a land ethic must evolve by people considering and discussing what it means.

During the hour-long broadcast, we will introduce you to the “land ethic” and the Aldo Leopold Foundation’s Land Ethic Leaders program. We’ll explore Leopold’s ideas in greater depth and explain how environmental education containing observation, participation and reflection can lead to greater engagement in conservation. We will also provide an overview of the Land Ethic Leaders workshop and how you can participate in the future.

Click here to download video!Landscape Conservation Design: Conserving Sustainable Landscapes for Natural Resources and People (01:12:19)

Human Dimensions Broadcast Series. Presented by Rob Campellone, USFWS, NWRS; Thomas Miewald, USFW S, N Pacific Landscape Conservation Coop and the NWRS; Charlie Pelizza, USFWS, Pelican Island NWR. February 12, 2014.

Hosted by Sarena Selbo, Chief, Branch of Conservation Planning and Design, USFWS, National Wildlife Refuge System. Presented by Rob Campellone, Landscape Conservation Design Policy Advisor, USFWS, National Wildlife Refuge System; Thomas Miewald, Landscape Ecologist, USFWS, North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative and the National Wildlife Refuge System; and Charlie Pelizza, Refuge Manager
USFWS, Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge.

Conserving sustainable landscapes in the 21st century is a significant challenge that requires a fundamental shift in thinking and action, addressing both social and ecological systems. "Landscape conservation design" involves intentional human changes to landscape patterns to sustainably provide ecosystem services that meet societal needs and respect societal values. This paradigm is innately interdisciplinary and partner-driven, involving diverse stakeholders, who plan, identify and implement strategies across the landscape to achieve diverse goals. In this broadcast, we will explore the "why," the "what" and the "how" of landscape conservation design, focusing on addressing both the ecological and human dimensions needed to achieve sustainable landscapes. The broadcast also includes an interactive round table discussion with the host and viewers asking the panel about their experiences with landscape conservation design and conserving sustainable landscapes.

Click here to download video!Meet Your New Boss (00:01:01) FWS recruiting video clip.

Click here to download video!Migratory Birds First Frontier (00:59:49)

Scott Weidensaul, Author, Ornithologist, Living on the Wind: Across the Hemisphere with Migratory Birds. May 2, 2012.

Bird migration is the world's only true unifying natural phenomenon, stitching the continents together in a way that even the great weather systems fail to do. Scott Weidensaul follows awesome kettles of hawks over the Mexican coastal plains, bar-tailed godwits that hitchhike on gale winds 7,000 miles nonstop across the Pacific from Alaska to New Zealand, and myriad songbirds whose numbers have dwindled so dramatically in recent decades. Migration paths form an elaborate global web that shows serious signs of fraying, and Weidensaul delves into the tragedies of habitat degradation and deforestation with an urgency that brings to life the vast problems these miraculous migrants now face. Living on the Wind is a magisterial work of nature writing.

Author and naturalist Scott Weidensaul has written more than two dozen books on natural history, including Living on the Wind: Across the Hemisphere with Migratory Birds, a Pulitzer Prize finalist; The Ghost with Trembling Wings, about the search for species that may or may not be extinct; and Of a Feather: A Brief History of American Birding. His newest book, The First Frontier: The Forgotten History of Struggle, Savagery and Endurance in Early America, will be published in February 2012.

Weidensaul lectures widely on wildlife and environmental topics, and is an active field researcher, specializing in birds of prey and hummingbirds. He lives in the Appalachians of eastern Pennsylvania, the heart of the old colonial frontier.

Click here to download video!Motivating Next Generation of Conservation Leaders (01:19:40)

Presented by Adam Kreek, Olympic Gold Medalist, Outdoor Adventurer, and Motivations Speaker. June 13, 2012.

This one-hour webcast is led by Adam Kreek, Olympic Gold Medalist, outdoor adventurer and motivational speaker. In three modules, Adam Kreek shares an overview of his background and philosophy of celebrating success; explores effective initiatives connecting young people to their environment and strategies for our organizations to build on these trends; and discusses key tools for success, including learning and teaching effective risk taking through outdoor experiences, and techniques for overcoming setbacks and failure.

Click here to download video!Nature-Based Tourism and Economic Benefits (01:25:18)

This is the first program in the Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Conservation series. Presenters: Nancy Milar, Texas Convention & Visitors Bureau; Ted Eubanks, Fermata; Toni Westland, FWS. February 2, 2012.

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation addresses the relationship of people to the land and wildlife. Through understanding matters such as human values, cultural ecology, sense of place and economics, we are better prepared to effectively manage and conserve our natural resources. The Fish and Wildlife Service mission speaks to this as we strive to protect and enhance fish, wildlife, plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

In this series we will introduce you to the subject of Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation through educational broadcasts, offered quarterly. The broadcasts will provide up-to-date academic theory and on-the-ground Fish and Wildlife Service examples. This introductory series in 2012 will include: Nature-based Tourism and Economic Benefits, Engaging Urban Communities through Birding, Social Aspects of Conservation Biology and Cultural Diversity of Refuge Visitors.

Upon completion of this course, you will be able to:

Define Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation;
Identify examples of the application of Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation in the US Fish and Wildlife Service; and
Locate Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation resources for use in further research and application.

Click here to download video!Performance Based Interviewing SU #7 (00:17:15) Presented by Chelsea Corcoran/Quadt, USFWS. Broadcast date: February 3, 2011.

Click here to download video!PollinatorLive: Nature's Partners-Pollinators, Plants & People (01:05:14)

Electronic Field Trip for students in grades 4 - 8 from the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin, TX. PollinatorLive is an environmental education program for schools. This program was recorded at the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center which is dedicated to preserving native plants and wildflowers and restoring the beauty and the biological richness of North America. Meet the pollinators and their plants and learn how people benefit.

Click here to download video!Queen of the Sun: What are the Bees Telling Us? (00:43:12)

NCTC Conservationists in Action Series; NCTC Historian, Dr. Mark Madison hosts an interview with Filmmaker Taggart Siegel. Recorded May 10, 2011. For more information on the film, please visit: http://www.queenofthesun.com

Click here to download video!“Sizzle” A Unique Perspective on Global Warming (00:58:41)

NCTC Historian, Dr. Mark Madison hosts an interview with Scientist, Author & Filmmaker Randy Olson who will discuss his new film “Sizzle”. Olson was a professor of marine biology at the University of New Hampshire. Despite his Harvard Ph.D., four years of post-doctoral research in Australia and Florida, and years of diving around the world from the Great Barrier Reef to Antarctica, he tossed it all in, resigned from his tenured professorship and moved to Hollywood to explore film as a medium for communicating science. Today he is an independent filmmaker and author of the book Don’t Be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in an Age of Style. Olson also travels around the country teaching scientists how to better communicate critical scientific ideas to the broader public.

Click here to download video!Sizzle Interview Teaser (0001:14)

NCTC Historian, Dr. Mark Madison hosts an interview with Scientist, Author & Filmmaker Randy Olson who will discuss his new film “Sizzle”.

Click here to download video!Social Aspects of Natural Resources Conservation (01:10:24)

Presented by Shawn Riley, MSU, Fisheries and Wildlife Scientist, Partnership for Ecosystem Research and Mgmt.; Natalie Sexton, USFWS, Natural Resource Program Center, Branch of Human Dimensions; Aaron Mize, USFWS, Bosque del Apache NWR. August 2012.

Knowledge for effective conservation includes knowledge about organisms, knowledge about the environment and knowledge about humans. In this broadcast, we will more clearly define this human aspect, which includes the application of social psychology, economics, political science,
communications and more. In part one of the session, the presenters will introduce the theory and practical application of this social aspect to our conservation work. We will also introduce you to the recently created Branch of Human Dimensions at the Natural Resource Program Center. Part two
is an interactive round table discussion, with the host and viewers asking the panel specific questions about their experience linking the human dimension with conservation.

Objectives: Upon completion of this series, you will be able to:

  • Define the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation;
  • Identify examples of the application of the Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation in the US Fish and Wildlife Service; and
  • Locate Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation resources for use in further research and application.

Click here to download video!The Supervisory Update #8 (00:45:01)

The Supervisory Update #8 features an overview of the new FBMS (Financial & Business Management System) and how to manage change. Broadcast date: June 9, 2011.

Click here to download video!Supervisory Update #9 (00:32:05)

The Supervisory Update #9 features an Introduction to FBMS (Financial & Business Management System); Telework Policy, Jim Willis, NCTC Deputy Director; and Supervising Remote Staff, Dan Nahler, Special Assistant Broadcast date: Aug 4, 2011

Click here to download video!Supervisory Update #10 (00:32:05)

The Supervisory Update #10 features FBMS (Financial & Business Management System) Overview Part III; New Supervisory Skills Workshop; Supervisory Role in DOI Learn; Coach's Corner: "Listen UP". Aired November 3, 2011

Click here to download video!The Birds of WV (00:53:18) Presented by Richard Bailey, State Ornithologist, WV Department of Natural Resources. June 2012.

Click here to download video!The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (CTN) (00:04:30)

Dr. Leskey, a stink bug research entomologist from the USDA Agricultural Research Service’s Appalachian Fruit Research Station in nearby Kearneysville, West Virginia, focuses her talks chiefly on the impacts to agricultural row crops, fruit orchard, and home gardens from the invasive Asian pest, which now has spread to 24 states and poses a major threat to apples, peaches, tomatoes, grapes, and other high-value produce. Leskey’s February 9 appearance, a lecture jointly sponsored by NCTC and the Potomac Valley Audubon Society, drew nearly 500 attendees from four states, “indicative of the concern that people in the mid-Atlantic region have about this invasive species, which is not only a household annoyance, but a genuine threat to American agriculture,” according to NCTC Director Jay Slack.

Click here to download video!Visitor Use Management: Balancing Societal Benefits with Resource Protection and Conservation (01:18:17)

Human Dimensions Broadcast Series. Host: Mike Carlo, USFWS, Nat'l Wildlife Refuge Sytem. Presenters Jeffrey Brooks, USFWS, Alaska Region; Jeffrey Marion, Natural Resource Recreation; and Bob Proudman, Appalachian Trail Conservancy. May 22, 2014.

Providing and managing visitor experiences in our parks, refuges and other natural areas can be both a challenge and an opportunity, as we strive to enhance the public's connection with the outdoors and balance it with conservation. In this broadcast we will explore the science and issues of visitor use management and how to integrate this with resource management. The broadcast also includes an interactive round table discussion with the
host and viewers asking the panel about their involvement with visitor use management.

Click here to download video!What does it Matter? Attitudes and Values Make a Difference for Conservation (01:15:58)

Human Dimensions of Natural Resources Conservation 2013 Broadcast Series. Presented by Jeremy T. Bruskotter, PhD, Ohio State University; Catherine E. Doyle-Capitman, Yale School; Michelle Potter and Natalie Sexton, USFWS. April 11, 2013.

How people think and feel about conservation holds clues for what people do about conservation. In this broadcast we will explore the science behind understanding the attitudes and values of stakeholders and how to integrate this knowledge into conservation. We will more systematically define these social influences and share methods to effectively measure them for use in natural resource management decisions. The broadcast also includes an interactive round table discussion with the host and viewers asking the panel about their experience working with attitudes and values for conservation.

Click here to download video!William Souder: The Life and Legacy of Rachel Carson (00:49:09)

NCTC Historian Mark Madison will host an interview with award-winning author William Souder. “On a Farther Shore: The Life and Legacy of Rachel Carson” is Souder's newly released biography. October 2012

Published on the fiftieth anniversary of her seminal book, Silent Spring, Souder’s just published book is an indelible new portrait of Rachel Carson, founder of the environmental movement. She loved the ocean and wrote three books about its mysteries, including the international bestseller The Sea Around Us. But it was with her fourth book, Silent Spring, that this unassuming biologist transformed our relationship with the natural world. Published in 1962, Silent Spring shocked the public and forced the government to take action-despite a withering attack on Carson from the chemicals industry. The book awakened the world to the heedless contamination of the environment and eventually led to the establishment of the EPA and to the banning of DDT and a host of related pesticides. Elegantly written and meticulously researched, On a Farther Shore reveals a shy yet passionate woman more at home in the natural world than in the literary one that embraced her. William Souder also writes sensitively of Carson's romantic friendship with Dorothy Freeman, and of her death from cancer in 1964. This extraordinary new biography captures the essence of one of the great reformers of the twentieth century.

William Souder has written for many prominent newspapers and magazines and is the author of A Plague of Frogs, a book about the investigation of outbreaks of deformed frogs across North America a decade ago, and Under a Wild Sky, a biography of John James Audubon and a Pulitzer Prize finalist.

Click here to down load video!Wind Energy Training Series for Voluntary Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines - Broadcast #1 (Part 1) (01:53:23)

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is pleased to announce a training broadcast series to cover the voluntary Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines and other relevant topics. May 22, 2013.

The Land-Based Wind Energy Guidelines are a tool for wind energy practitioners to minimize adverse effects of wind energy development and operation to wildlife and their habitats. The guidelines focus on collaboration of federal and state agencies, tribes, industry, and non-governmental organizations to develop environmentally responsible wind energy facilities.

The bimonthly broadcasts will cover emerging issues and provide direction for wind energy facility planning, development, and operations.

For additional information, click here!

Click here to down load video!Wind Energy Training Series for Voluntary Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines Broadcast #1 ( Part 2) (00:41:39) See above.

Click here to down load video!Wind Energy Training Series for Voluntary Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines - Broadcast #2 (01:53:23)

Announcing the 2nd Broadcast of the Wind Energy Training Series for Voluntary Land-Based Wind Energy Guidelines. Hosted by Christy Johnson-Hughes, USFWS. July 31, 2013

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently débuted a training broadcast series to cover topics associated with wind energy and other relevant topics, such as the voluntary Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines.

Host Christy Johnson-Hughes will be joined by several guests who will cover topics including the new Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance, Tier 3 bat surveys, and a study demonstrating the use of the Guidelines at an existing wind energy facility in West Virginia.

The bimonthly broadcasts will cover emerging issues and provide direction for wind energy facility planning, development, and operations.

Click here to download video!Wind Energy Training Series: Tier 4 of the Wind Energy Guidelines - Broadcast #3 (01:59:56)

The 3rd broadcast of the Wind Energy Training Series for Voluntary Land-Based Wind Energy Guidelines. Hosted by Christy Johnson-Hughes, USFWS. October 30, 2013.

Host Christy Johnson-Hughes will be joined by guests who will discuss topics related to Tier 4 of the Wind Energy Guidelines (post-construction), including fatality estimation, reporting, and adaptive management. The Law Enforcement Perspective will be presented in the 2nd half of this program.
In May 2013, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began a training broadcast series to cover topics associated with wind energy and other relevant topics, such as the voluntary Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines. View previous broadcasts and related materials

These broadcasts cover emerging issues and provide direction for wind energy facility planning, development, and operations. This live broadcast will be available online at:http://distancelearning.fws.gov/ctn.html

The Land-Based Wind Energy Guidelines are a tool for wind energy practitioners to minimize adverse effects of wind energy development and operation to wildlife and their habitats. The guidelines focus on collaboration of federal and state agencies, tribes, industry, and non-governmental organizations to develop environmentally responsible wind energy facilities. 

To learn more about U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Wind Energy topics, please visit: http://www.fws.gov/windenergy

Click here to download video!Wind Energy Training Series: Wind Energy Guidelines - Broadcast #4 (01:54:17)

Host: Christy Johnson-Hughes, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Presenters: Kathy Boydston, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies; Charles Newcomb, Endurance Wind Power; and Jennifer Norris, Ohio Department of Natural Resources. January 29, 2014.

Click here to download video!Wind Energy Training Broadcast Series - Broadcast #5 (01:56:50)

Host: Christy Johnson-Hughes, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Presenters Wally Erickson and Chad Le Beau, WEST, Inc. and Cris Hein, Bat Conservation International. April 23, 2014.

In May 2013, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began a training broadcast series to cover topics associated with wind energy and other relevant topics, such as the voluntary Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines. These broadcasts cover emerging issues and provide direction for wind energy facility planning, development, and operations. The Land-Based Wind Energy Guidelines are a tool for wind energy practitioners to minimize adverse effects of wind energy development and operation to wildlife and their habitats. The guidelines focus on collaboration of federal and state agencies, tribes, industry, and non-governmental organizations to develop environmentally responsible wind energy facilities.