Advanced Topics in Conservation Genetics Webinar Series

Advanced Topics in Conservation Genetics

These webinars provide biologist and managers with the latest techniques in conservation genetics.

This webinar series is for educational purposes only. The opinions, ideas or data presented in this webinar series do not represent FWS policy or constitute endorsement by FWS. Some of the materials and images may be protected by copyright or may have been licenses to us by a third party and are restricted in their use.  Mention of any product names, companies, Web links, textbooks, or other references does not imply Federal endorsement.

Schedule

June - November 2014

Description

Date: October 15th, 2014
Time: 3:00-4:00 PM ET
Topic:

Gene-associated markers provide tools for tackling illegal fishing and false eco-certification

Captioning: Captioning services will be available for this webinar.
Archive: If you are unable to attend this webinar, it will be recorded and posted to the Advanced Topics in Conservation Genetics Webinar Series Archive approximately 1-2 weeks after the presentation.
Presenter:

Dr. Robin Waples, NOAA.

Description: Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fishing has had a major role in the overexploitation of global fish populations. In response, international Desert Tortoise.  Photo by USFWSregulations have been imposed and many fisheries have been 'eco-certified' by consumer organizations, but methods for independent control of catch certificates and eco-labels are urgently needed. Here we show that, by using gene-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms, individual marine fish can be assigned back to population of origin with unprecedented high levels of precision. By applying high differentiation single nucleotide polymorphism assays, in four commercial marine fish, on a pan-European scale, we find 93–100% of individuals could be correctly assigned to origin in policy-driven case studies. We show how case-targeted single nucleotide polymorphism assays can be created and forensically validated, using a centrally maintained and publicly available database. Our results demonstrate how application of gene-associated markers will likely revolutionize origin assignment and become highly valuable tools for fighting illegal fishing and mislabelling worldwide.

Registration

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Contacts

Registration

Marilyn Williams, Training Technician, Conservation Science and Policy Branch, National Conservation Training Center at 304-876-7940; e-mail marilyn_williams@fws.gov

Content

Matthew Patterson, Course Leader, Conservation Science and Policy Branch, National Conservation Training Center at 304-876-7473; e-mail matthew_patterson@fws.gov