The Restoration Webinar Series

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These webinars showcase innovative restoration techniques and best management practives while disscussing our biggest restoration challenges and success.

This webinar series is brought to you by a partnership between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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The views, opinions, or positions expressed in this webinar series are those of the guest presenter and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions, or positions of the Department of Interior, Department of Commerce, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service or the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Some of the materials and images may be protected by copyright or may have been licensed to us by a third party and are restricted in their use. Mention of any product names, companies, web links, textbooks, or other references does not imply Federal endorsement.

Schedule

Restoration Webinar Series Schedule (PDF)

Description #1

Date: Thursday, February 12, 2015
Time: 2pm - 3pm (Eastern Time)
Topic:

The bio-geo-socio-chemistry of urban riparian zones

Presenter: Peter M. Groffman, Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
Captioning: Captioning Services will be available for this webinar. Please send an e-mail tomatthew_patterson@fws.gov if you are interested in captioning services for this webinar.
Archive: Restoration Webinar Series Archive
Description: Riparian areas are “hotspots” of plant-soil-water-microbial-human infloodplainswidth=teractions in watersheds. Urban land use change has been shown to have dramatic effects on these interactions altering “connections” between streams, riparian zones, upland ecosystems and people. Efforts to restore urban riparian zone need to focus on reestablishing these connections. Geomorphic stream restoration designed to reverse structural degradation can restore biogeochemical functions but also considering the “human element” create positive feedbacks between ecological restoration and human preferences that can be key for achieving specific biological, chemical and social goals in urban and suburban watersheds. In this talk I will highlight results from research on the bio-geo-socio chemistry of urban riparian zones in the National Science Foundation funded Baltimore urban Long Term Ecological Research Project and discuss relevance and applications of this work in more arid regions.

Registration

Registration iconRegister for the Webinar.

Contacts

Registration

Marilyn Williams, Training Technician, Conservation Science and Policy Branch, National Conservation Training Center at 304-876-7940; e-mail marilyn_williams@fws.gov

Content

Matthew Patterson, Course Leader, Conservation Science and Policy Branch, National Conservation Training Center at 304-876-7473; e-mail matthew_patterson@fws.gov

Description #2

Date: Wednesday, February 18, 2015
Time: 2pm - 3pm (Eastern Time)
Topic:

Evaluating restoration effects on age-0 salmon habitat in a large regulated river system in Northern California

Presenter: Damon Goodman, USFWS
Captioning: Captioning Services will be available for this webinar. Please send an e-mail tomatthew_patterson@fws.gov if you are interested in captioning services for this webinar.
Archive: Restoration Webinar Series Archive
Description: To combat decades of anthropogenic degradation, restoration programs seek to improve ecological conditions through habitat enhancement. Rapid assessments of condition are needed to support adaptive management programs and improve the understanding of restoration effects at a range of spatial and temporal scales. Previous attempts to evaluate restoration pracfloodplainswidth=tices on large river systems have been hampered by assessment tools that are irreproducible or metrics without clear connections to population responses. We modified a demonstration flow assessment approach to assess the realized changes in habitat quantity and quality attributable to restoration effects. We evaluated the technique’s ability to predict anadromous salmonid habitat and survey reproducibility on the Trinity River in northern California. Fish preference clearly aligned with a priori designations of habitat quality: the odds of observing rearing Chinook Salmon or Coho Salmon within high quality habitats ranged between 10 and 16 times greater than low qualities, and in all cases the highest counts were associated with highest quality habitat. In addition, the technique proved to be reproducible with “substantial” to “almost perfect” agreement of results from independent crews; a considerable improvement over a previous demonstration flow assessment. The technique is now being implemented to assess changes in habitat from restoration efforts at several scales and inform adaptive management decisions.

Registration

Registration iconRegister for the Webinar.

Contacts

Registration: Marilyn Williams, Training Technician, Conservation Science and Policy Branch, National Conservation Training Center at 304-876-7940; e-mail marilyn_williams@fws.gov

Content

Matthew Patterson, Course Leader, Conservation Science and Policy Branch, National Conservation Training Center at 304-876-7473; e-mail matthew_patterson@fws.gov